Fitness during Pregnancy

I’ve had a pretty fun past few days. We planted the garden on Saturday and then it snowed Sunday! Really? It was 74 last week. Then I was sick Sunday night… and Monday night. I think Little C rolls on or into my stomach and makes me want to puke. I just remind myself I am so very grateful for this baby.

Onto the article of the day. I thought I’d continue the health theme and share a paper I wrote about a year ago for my Pregnancy and Infancy class at BYU (please don’t plagiarize it but honestly, I wouldn’t know either way, it’s just bad form).

Here is a quick summary for those who aren’t interested in the academia speak:

There are tons of benefits for both the mother and child if a woman exercises while she is pregnant. Any amount of exercise is good but, it is generally recommended to switch to low impact workouts or, if you weren’t active before, to slowly start an exercise program with guidance from your doctor.

So, what are the benefits you may ask? First of all shorter labor. Women who worked out had an average of 30 minutes less of labor. Now, that’s not huge, but I bet during labor it’d be pretty nice. You’re also less likely to have a c-section. I don’t know how many of you that’s encouraging to, but I don’t want to have a c-section so I’ll offer it as incentive. There are the benefits during labor, but there’s also benefits during pregnancy and postpartum. You’ll have less weight gain during pregnancy (obviously), but you’ll also (statistically) retain less weight postpartum! Maybe I’m vain, but I like the idea of that. The final benefit mommies is that exercise reduces negative emotions (like anxiety or depression), just like they do before you’re pregnant!

What about your darling baby who is the whole point of the debacle? Guess what? You get to start taking care of him/her before they come. So, if you work out, your baby should have a higher placental weight. To contrast that, low placental weight is associated with blood problems and smaller than average children. The baby will also be at a lower risk for pre-term birth (why this is bad?).  Yeah exercise!

Here are my favorite pregnancy exercise videos to give you some encouragement:

I didn’t work out the first two months of my pregnancy but, around the third I started feeling better and started doing 10 minute workout videos every night. During month 5 I moved up to 20 minute workout videos. This isn’t a lot but, it wears me out.

So, tell me gals, what do you do to keep fit during pregnancy?

xoxo,

Kels

 

Below is my entire paper for more info:

The Benefits of Exercise during Pregnancy

Introduction

            The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists states, in the absence of either medical or obstetric complications, 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise a day on most, if not all, days of the week is recommended for pregnant women” (Women’s Health Care Physicians, 2009, line 6 – 8). But, what are the benefits for pregnant women who exercise? This paper explains the mental and physical benefit to mothers as well as the benefits for babies if a women exercises while pregnant.

Synthesized Review of Literature

Benefits to Mother

Delivery Outcomes

Labor is a very difficult and painful time for women and many women would love to shorten their labor times. Ghodsi, Asltoghiri, and Hajiloomohajerani (2011) found that women who completed light intensity training three times a week for 30 to 45 minutes had shorter first stage labor times. There was not a large difference however. Women who trained had between 4.18 hours to 6.9 hours of labor whereas non-training women had labor between 4.7 hours and 7.5 hours of labor. There was no difference in second stage labor times. However, with thirty minutes less time in first stage labor, one may presume that a mother would have more energy to complete second stage labor. More research is needed to see if more exercise, such as the amount the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends, will lead to wider differences in labor times.

Women that are active are also less likely to have a cesarean section. Price, Amini, and Kappeler found that only 6% of their subjects that were active had cesarean section compared to 32% of the women in their control group (2012, p. 2267) Cesarean sections are invasive and also lead to longer recovery times and thus are a detriment to mothers.

Mental and Physical Benefits

There are many benefits to the mental and physical state of the mother, if the mother exercises during pregnancy. Haakstad and Bo (2011) found that not only did women who participated in an exercise program gain less weight during pregnancy but they also had significantly lower weight retention postpartum. This is both a physical benefit, for obvious reasons, and a mental benefit for women who place value on being a certain weight and bouncing back from their pregnancy weight quickly. This study also studied an exercise program that had less than the recommended amount of exercise. This study’s program consisted of aerobic exercise for 60 minutes twice a week. More research is needed to see if the benefits continue with more exercise.

Furthermore, Guszkowska, Langwald, and Sempolska compared exercise to relaxation techniques and showed that both resulted in, “the emotional state of pregnant women improve[ing]” (2013, p. 129). However, there were notable differences in the way each variable affected the women. Guszkowska, Langwald, and Sempolska state:

Relaxation caused a distinct decrease of negative emotional states – anxiety and tense arousal and an increase of hedonic tone – while energetic arousal did not increase. In the physical exercise group, the decrease in anxiety and tension was smaller, the increase in pleasure feeling was not as distinctive, but the increase in energetic arousal was more significant …Therefore, physical exercise seems to be less effective in reducing negative emotional states than relaxation sessions, but more successful in increasing positive states. (2013, p.129)

Women that have anxiety and depression benefit more from relaxation techniques because of the decrease in negative emotions but also benefit from exercise as a way of lowering the amount of anxiety and depression they feel while raising their energy levels. Women who feel lethargic and exhausted during pregnancy benefit most from exercise because they feel “a surge of vitality, vigour and vital energy” (Guszkowska, Langwald, and Sempolska, 2013, p. 130). Thus women who exercise during pregnancy, contrary to what one would suppose, feel more energized rather than more fatigued.

Benefits to Baby

Many women are more concerned about how their actions during pregnancy will affect their baby more than themselves. Exercise during pregnancy also benefits the baby. Firstly, Price, Amini, and Kappeler found that, “[a]lthough the exercise regimen was vigorous enough to improve fitness, it had no adverse effect on overall pregnancy length, fetal birth weight, Apgar scores, or placenta weight compared with sedentary controls” (2012, p. 2267). Thus, women seeking to change from a sedentary lifestyle to an active lifestyle during pregnancy can do so without risking harm to their baby. Price, Amini, and Kappeler furthered their research by stating, “placenta weight was slightly higher in the active group, consistent with evidence that exercise augments placental growth during early and mid pregnancy” (2012, p.2267).  Low placental weight is associated with short umbilical cord length and velamentous cord insertion (McNamara, Hutcheon, Platt, Benjamin, and Kramer, 2014, p. 102). It is also associated with “high hemoglobin values in neonates and lower-than-expected body size in later childhood” (Naeye, 1987, p.387)

Other findings suggest that maternal exercise while pregnant decreases the risk of pre-term delivery. Guendelman, Pearl, Kosa, Graham, Abrams, and Kharrazi found that, “each incremental hour per week of moderate exercise during the second trimester was associated with a reduced risk of PTD. Furthermore, the benefits of moderate exercise appeared strongest for those with a pre-pregnancy BMI C 24 kg/m2” (2013, p.726). While exercise benefits babies from all mothers, mothers were overweight before pregnancy benefit even more than those that had normal weight. Owe, Stigum, Nystad, and Bo’s findings also support this claim. They found that engaging in regular exercise during pregnancy shifts the GA distribution slightly upward resulting in a moderately reduced risk of preterm births and a few more postterm births  (2012, p.1072)

Application

            It is evident that exercise is beneficial for both a pregnant woman and perinatal baby. There

are multiple applications for this research.
Delivery Outcomes for Mother
Mothers that are at risk for long labors and cesarean sections would benefit from exercise

(Ghodsi, Asltoghiri, and Hajiloomohajerani, 2011 and Price, Amini, and Kappeler, 2012). Labor is

generally a long an arduous process and any woman would benefit from shortening it. However, first

time mothers, who generally have longer labors, will benefit from the shortening the most Long

labors can lead to exhaustion and necessitate non-natural labors in mothers that wish to have natural

labors. Doctors, midwives, and birthing class instructors can also this as an incentive to mothers to

exercise. One of the most dreaded parts of pregnancy is the long labor. Pregnant women that are not

encouraged to exercise by the other benefits noted may exercise to reduce their own pain.
 Mental and Physical Benefits to Mother
Pregnant women can benefit physically and mentally from exercise and relaxation training

(Guszkowska, Langwald, and Sempolska, 2013). Birthing class teachers can learn from this research

and encourage or implement exercise and relaxation training to lower stress levels. Doctors that are

treating clinically depressed or anxious mothers should encourage and teach relaxation techniques

and/or exercise either as an alternative to medication or in conjunction with lower medication dosage

depending on the severity of the depression and anxiety and the type of medication the mother is

taking. Stress during pregnancy can result in low birth weight or preterm delivery which leads to

possible negative outcomes for the infant, so, it is important to decrease stress for pregnant women.

The encouraged exercise and resulting invigoration is also beneficial for women who feel extremely

lethargic, which is common during pregnancy.

Women can encourage themselves to participate in exercise programs by committing to work

out with a pregnant friend or their partner. There are also many gyms that offer pregnancy work-out
classes that women can participate in and gain not only the benefits mentioned here of exercise but

also the benefits of having an emotional support group.

Benefits to Baby

Babies benefit from having healthy and happy mothers, which exercise during pregnancy adds to. But, babies also benefit physically from their mother exercising. Pregnant women who exercise at least one hour a week decrease their risk of preterm delivery (Guendelman, Pearl, Kosa, Graham, Abrams, and Kharrazi, 2012). “This modest amount of exercise seems clinically important given that women are mainly sedentary and PTD remains a leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality” (Guendelman, Pearl, Kosa, Graham, Abrams, and Kharrazi, 2012, p.726). Furthermore, according to the Mayo Clinic, preterm delivery can cause breathing problems, heart problems, brain problems, temperature control problems, gastrointestinal problems, blood problems, metabolism problems, immune system problems, cerebral palsy, impaired cognitive skills, vision problems, hearing problems, dental problems, behavioral and psychological problems, or other chronic health issues (2014). By exercising a woman can decrease the chances that her child will suffer from these because of their decreased chance of preterm delivery.

Conclusion

Numerous studies show that exercise during pregnancy is beneficial to both mother anc child (Ghodsi, Asltoghiri, and Hajiloomohajerani, 2011, Guendelman, Pearl, Kosa, Graham, Abrams, and Kharrazi, 2013, Guszkowska, Langwald, and Sempolska, 2013, Haakstad and Bø, 2011, Owe, Stigum, Nystad, and Bø, 2012, Price, Amini, and Kappeler, 2012). Doctors, midwives, and birthing instructors should all encourage exercise to those women who are able to do so. Pregnant women should understand the benefits of exercising during pregnancy and not believe in the myth that exercise hurts infants.

References

Ghodsi, Z., Asltoghiri, M., & Hajiloomohajerani, M. (2011). Exercise and pregnancy: Duration of labor stages and Perinea tear rates. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 31, 441-445. Retrieved March 8, 2015, fromhttp://www.sciencedirect.com.erl.lib.byu.edu/science/article/pii/S1877042811030114#

Guendelman, S., Pearl, M., Kosa, J. L., Graham, S., Abrams, B., & Kharrazi, M. (2013). Association between preterm delivery and pre-pregnancy body mass (BMI), exercise and sleep during pregnancy among working women in Southern California. Maternal And Child Health Journal, 17(4), 723-731. doi:10.1007/s10995-012-1052-5

Guszkowska, M., Langwald, M., & Sempolska, K. (2013). Influence of a relaxation session and an exercise class on emotional states in pregnant women. Journal of Reproductive And Infant Psychology, 31(2), 121-133. doi:10.1080/02646838.2013.784897

Haakstad, L. H., & Bø, K. (2011). Effect of regular exercise on prevention of excessive weight gain in pregnancy: A randomised controlled trial. The European Journal Of Contraception And Reproductive Health Care, 16(2), 116-125. doi:10.3109/13625187.2011.560307

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2014, November 27). Premature Birth: Complications. Retrieved March 9, 2015, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/premature-birth/basics/complications/con-20020050

McNamara, H., Hutcheon, J. A., Platt, R. W., Benjamin, A., & Kramer, M. S. (2014). Risk Factors for High and Low Placental Weight. Paediatric & Perinatal Epidemiology, 28(2), 97-105. doi:10.1111/ppe.12104

Naeye, R. (1987). Do placental weights have clinical significance? Human Pathology, 387-391.

Owe, K., Stigum, H., Nystad, W., & Bø, K. (2012). Does Exercise during Pregnancy Affect Gestational lenght at Birth. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 44(6), 1067-1074. Retrieved March 8, 2015, from OvidSP.

Price, B., Amini, S., & Kappeler, K. (2012). Exercise in Pregnancy: Effect on Fitness and Obstetric Outcomes—A Randomized Trial. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 44(12), 2263-2269. Retrieved March 7, 2015, from OvidSP.

Women’s Health Care Physicians. (2009, January 1). Retrieved March 7, 2015, fromhttp://www.acog.org/Resources-And-Publications/Committee-Opinions/Committee-on-Obstetric-Practice/Exercise-During-Pregnancy-and-the-Postpartum-Period

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Baby Necessities on a Budget: Pre-Baby

Now, this may seem a little silly to do but, I love before and afters! I’ve never had a child though, in full disclosure, I currently work in the child care industry, I’ve nannied, and I’ve babysat (a lot). So, I do have experience with children. I’m also an extreme researcher (mostly because I am ridiculously indecisive). With that combo, I am pretty confident that I have a decent list. No guarantees though. I’ll make a Post-Baby list a couple months AFTER Little C is born too. I’m interested to see how my list changes.

So, without further ado (hey, I had to rhyme), here is my list of baby necessities for the first six months (and what we are going to buy/have bought):

  1. Convertible Crib & Mattress: Sniglar Crib ($79, Ikea) + Vyssa Sloa Mattress ($49.99, Ikea) – Pretty obvious why we need a crib and mattress. The baby needs somewhere to sleep. We considered just getting a pack n’ play but, for the same price we can get an Ikea crib! We went to Ikea and looked at the different cribs. The crib is a little too low for Mr. B (who is 6’2″) but, he said that was fine for the price difference. It is a convertible crib from basinettish (pictured below), to crib (with the bottom lowered), to toddler bed (with the side removed). We also felt the mattress while we were there. You really want a firm mattress for safe sleep when it comes to babies. I liked how firm the Sloa was. It’s not the cheapest they have but, I think it will be safest for Little C.                                                                                             SNIGLAR Crib IKEA The bed base can be placed at two different heights.VYSSA SLÖA Mattress for crib IKEA
  2. Car Seat: Britax USA Boulevard ClickTight Convertible Car Seat, Metro ($270, Amazon) – Another necessity that is pretty obvious. Our hospital (and most hospitals in the US, I think) require you to have a properly installed car seat before you can take the baby from the hospital (not that I would want Little C in the car without a car seat anyway). We bought ours during Black Friday for $270, it was $50 off at the time. It has since dropped to $277 so, we still got it for cheaper (plus one of our rewards credit cards was doing 5% back on all Amazon purchases that month so, we got 5% back too). A car seat isn’t something I was willing to skimp on. The Britax ClickTight series has great safety ratings though it is a little heavy. We decided we didn’t want an infant car seat for a couple of reasons. Firstly, that would be an extra cost because we’d have to buy two car seats (no thanks). Secondly, I think it would be tempting to leave the baby in it for extended periods of time when we were out somewhere like church or the doctor’s office. This isn’t good for the baby. Thirdly (and probably the biggest reason), I hate infant car seats. They are always too heavy for me to carry (which they should be with all the padding and safety materials) and they hit me over and over again in the knees. I can’t stand them. I’d rather take the baby out and carry him.                                                                                                              Britax USA Boulevard ClickTight Convertible Car Seat, Metro
  3. Waterproof Mattress Pad (x2): Sealy Waterproof Mattress Cover, 2 pack ($22.81, Amazon) – We chose these pads because they were the cheapest with the best review. Just a warning: There were a bunch of mattress pads claiming they reduce SIDS. THIS IS NOT TRUE. SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) by, definition does not have a knowable cause. There are ways to statistically lower the chances of SIDS but, as the last point in the linked to article points out there is zero evidence to support any products that claim to reduce SIDS (on the flip side, if you want to buy a product despite the fact that it doesn’t reduce SIDS, go for it). Anyway, off my soapbox. We chose two mattress pads because I red this tip online somewhere, that if you layer crib sheet, mattress pad, crib sheet, and mattress pad, you won’t have to worry about a middle of the night blow out. You just take off the first layer and voila you already have a second layer! Given how frequently we’ll be doing laundry with cloth diapers, I doubt we’ll need more than two.Sealy Waterproof Mattress Cover, White, 2 Pack
  4. Crib Sheet (x2): Cosco Jersey Sheet, yellow ($6, Kid to Kid [the children’s consignment store nearby]) and American Baby Company 100% Cotton Value Jersey Knit Crib Sheet, Celery ($9.63, Amazon) – See above why we are getting 2 sheets. We already have the first sheet and the second sheet isn’t picked for any other reason than it is in our colors (green, yellow, and beige) and the reviews said they were soft. We’ll keep our eyes peeled as we shop for a better deal though.
  5. Bouncer: We got a bouncer as a gift for Christmas. We really don’t have room in our apartment for a swing which would have been the other option.
  6. Carrier: DIY Moby ($6, Fabric Center) – As mentioned above, I hate baby car seats but, I still need a way to carry the baby with my hands free. I decided $40 for a long strip of fabric was way too expensive, so, I made one. (Cameo from the teddy bear’s ear). Green is Mr. B’s favorite color and it just so happens to look great on me too so, that is the color we chose.DIY Moby Baby Carrier
  7. Cloth Diapers ($300-400, Amazon, Ebay, Kid to Kid). I’ll talk more about cloth diapers in another post(s) because I can go on for days about cloth diapers. But, to keep it simple here, we bought a set of 24 used newborn AIOs for $100 on ebay and have been scouting for deals for one size diapers since we found out I was pregnant. We spent $20 on one AIO but the rest have been under $12. We currently have 3 All-in-One diapers, 2 pocket diapers, 7 All-in-Twos diapers in the one size (which is usually about 10 – 35 pounds). Those total another $120 spent. Most sites recommend 18-20 diapers for one size diapers. We are waiting to see which diapers we like most before we purchase the rest of our stash.
  8. Cloth Diaper Accessories: EcoAble Large Wet Bag (x2, $19.99 each, Amazon) and Damero Cute Travel Baby Wet and Dry Cloth Diaper Organizer Bag ($6.99, Amazon) – look how cute that pattern is!) Kirkland Flushable Wipes ($12, Costco). So, we are getting two large wet bags (which hold the diapers between changes and getting washed) for at home, that way we can switch them off while they are getting washed. The medium wet bag is for the diaper bag. We’ll use cloth wipes (made from fabric scraps I have laying about) for number ones and flushable wipes for number twos.                      Large Hanging Wet Dry Bag for Baby Cloth Diapers or Laundry (Yellow) Damero Cute Travel Baby Wet and Dry Cloth Diaper Organizer Bag (Medium, Animals)
  9. Clothes: We expect to get most of Little C’s clothes from the baby shower or our parents. People love buying baby clothes. We want at least 5-6 onesies/footie (depending on the time of year) in each size and two hats. We already have a bunting for when it gets colder (thanks mom!). We also want 2-3 sleepers for when he grows out of his swaddles (see below). He’ll also have 2 Sunday church outfits and a couple pairs of socks. Will he have more clothes than this? Probably. Like I said, people love buying baby clothes (including me).
  10. Baby Wash: Johnson’s Natural Head-to-Toe Foaming Baby Wash ($7.99, Target). This is not the cheapest body wash there is but, I’m a little more comfortable with the ingredients in this one, however, if we find we need to cut back, we’ll go with the non-natural Johnson’s baby wash. Johnson’s Natural Head-to-Toe Foaming Baby Wash - 18 oz.
  11. Coconut Oil ($10, Costco) – This will be used for diaper cream, as it is cloth diaper safe, and baby lotion. I’m not sure how to estimate the cost for this one because we have coconut oil as a staple in the house already. I estimate about $10 because a little goes a LONG way.
  12. Gentle Washcloth – My dad sent us a set of like 20 organic bamboo washcloths as soon as he found out we were pregnant. I don’t think we’ll need 20 (maybe we’ll use some as wipes) but, they are really soft and will be great for washing the baby!
  13. Swaddlers (x2): Summer Infant SwaddleMe 2 Pack 100% Organic Adjustable Infant Wrap, 7-14 Lbs, Small-Medium, Ivory/Green ($19.36 for 2, Amazon). I am really nervous about swaddling myself because you can do it so wrong and create some bad developmental problems for your child’s hips. Also, I think it is probably easier for Little C to get out of a swaddle I made than a swaddle made by the Swaddlemes. So, I think it is worth it to have these but, if you know how to swaddle go for receiving blankets. Summer Infant SwaddleMe 2 Pack 100% Organic Adjustable Infant Wrap, 7-14 Lbs, Small-Medium, Ivory/Green
  14. Health Kit: The First Years American Red Cross Baby Healthcare And Grooming Kit ($13.37, Amazon). Another self-explanatory necessity. I mostly chose this kit for the nail clippers, nasal aspirator, and medicine dispenser. We might buy those separately if we can find a good price.  If we can afford to buy an ear thermometer, like this, we’ll buy one of those too. The First Years American Red Cross Baby Healthcare And Grooming Kit
  15. Bottle (x2, free!) and Pacifier (x4): As you might’ve seen from my Amazon and Target gift box/bag, I got a free bottle in each. Since I will be at home and hopefully breast feeding, we won’t need that many bottles but, I (and Mr.B) still want Mr. B to have some opportunities to bond with Little C via feeding. Little C will also have to take the bottle when he’s babysat! Little C will also need Phillips Avent Soothie Pacifier ($3.84 for 2, Amazon) if he takes pacifiers. I’ll start with 2 but, with pacifiers being the size of keys, I’ll most likely loose them everywhere.
  16. Breast Pump: Hopefully, my insurance will cover an electric breast pump but, I haven’t called yet to check. If it doesn’t I’ll get the Philips Avent Manual Comfort Breast Pump ($25.99, Amazon). A manual pump is more of a hassle than an electric pump but, I can deal with that for a quarter of the price and for the amount that I will be pumping (hopefully not very much!). Philips Avent Manual Comfort Breast Pump
  17. Burp Rags: Gerber 10 Pack Prefold Birdseye Diaper, White ($15.99, Amazon). I’ve heard that while these are AWFUL cloth diapers, they are great for burp rags!
  18. Doggie Seatbelt: Kra-mar Roadie Dog Seatbelt (Petlife), Large ($34.10, Amazon). Now, I know this won’t be a need for everyone (or even most people) but, for me it was an absolute must. Firstly, how safe is that baby car seat if Wheatley flies around the car and hits Little C (and mom and dad) multiple times in a car wreck. The answer: not. Secondly, Wheatley should be safe and I should’ve bought him a seat belt a long time ago. Thirdly, Wheatley’s favorite spot in the car is standing in the middle of the backseat so he can look out the front window. Do you know where the baby’s car seat is safest? The middle of the backseat. Wheatley is going to be trying to climb all over Little C if I let him. But, I don’t want to let him so the seatbelt will strap him onto one of the side seats.                   Kra-mar Roadie Dog Seatbelt (Petlife) Large - Size: Large
  19. Humidifier (by wintertime): Mistmate Ultrasonic Hum White ($27.49, Target). It gets dry in Utah. Really dry. Honestly, I don’t know why we don’t have a humidifier already because, I get headaches from the dryness. This is not necessarily a need but, I worry that if I’m uncomfortable Little C will be too, which will result in me being even more uncomfortable (baby screaming while I already have a headache? I’ll try to avoid that as much as possible).
  20. Diaper Bag: Classic Plaid Multifunction Large Capacity Hand Bag Shoulder Bag Backpack Baby Diaper Baby Care Product (Blue) ($30.47). I searched for hours for a diaper bag that wasn’t too expensive ($100+ for a bag, heck no!), that was stylish enough for me to enjoy wearing, and that Mr. B could wear without any embarrassment. I finally came to this bag and I LOVE it. It is stylish, has three ways to wear it (including a backpack way for Mr. B), and has lots of organization pockets. Plus, it has great reviews. I honestly cannot wait to get this bag.

Classic Plaid Multifunction Large Capacity Hand Bag Shoulder Bag Backpack Baby Diaper Baby Care Product (Blue)

Bonus: Before Little C starts crawling, I’ll need to get some furniture and TV straps, any good suggestions for apartment dwellers?

Hope this list helped. What’s on your list?

xoxo,

Kels

Roundup: Baby DIYs you can do BEFORE you find out the gender

I don’t know about you but, for me I wanted to start making and buying things for Little C (or Little Lamb as he was called then) as SOON as I found out I was pregnant. I was so excited! A lot of the DIYs running amok on the internet are for clothes but, of course I didn’t know yet if I needed to make headbows (Little baby girls don’t have hair to put bows in, so they’re headbows, not hair bows – Mr B) or bowties (team bowtie!), so, instead I have made a list of DIYs you can make before you know lad or lass and before you even choose nursery colors! So, without further ado:

Old McDonald Puppets

Make one or make all or make one a month to measure your pregnancy!

Taggie Bean Bag

I actually made one of these for my nephew before he was born and he LOVES it. I filled mine with rice instead of beans, because that’s what we had on hand.

Baby Countdown

This one is more for the parents but, it is oh so cute!DIY Countdown to Baby Blocks

Happy Stacker

Instead of hard plastic and wood you can make a stacker out of fabric!Happy stacker

Foam Blocks

Once again, softer than wooden or plastic blocks and won’t freak out the dog or hurt me when Little C flings them across the room.DSC_0002

Beach Ball

If you can’t sense a pattern, I like things that babies can throw without worrying about it hurting. Gotta work up those throwing muscles!

Nessie Stuffed Animal

Just about any stuffed animal would work on this list but, I absolutely loved Nessie and how she is big enough to ride when baby gets bigger!

 

What DIYs are you making for your baby? I’m working on a green romper, then a stuffed spaceship after that! Happy crafting,

xoxo,

Kels